Learning is not attained by chance; it must be sought for with ardor and attended to with diligence. (Abigail Adams, 1780).

The study of economics does not seem to require any specialised gifts of an unusually high order. Is it not, intellectually regarded, a very difficult subject compared with the higher branches of philosophy and pure science? Yet good, or even competent, economists are the rarest of birds. An easy subject, at which very few excel! The paradox finds its explanation, perhaps, in that the master-economist must possess a rare combination of gifts. He must reach a high standard in several different directions and must combine talents not often found together. He must be mathematician, historian, statesman, philosopher—in some degree. He must understand symbols and speak in words. He must contemplate the particular in terms of the general, and touch abstract and concrete in the same flight of thought. He must study the present in the light of the past for the purposes of the future. No part of man's nature or his institutions must lie entirely outside his regard. He must be purposeful and disinterested in a simultaneous mood; as aloof and incorruptible as an artist, yet sometimes as near the earth as a politician. (John Maynard Keynes,  Essays in Biography (1933), 170.)

 

I hear and I forget; I see and I remember; I do and I understand.
 


Dr. Christopher Marmé

Professor. Department of Economics.

Chair.  Department of Economics

Frank Strohkarck Professor of Business and Economics

115 Evald Hall

(309) 794-7514

Email: chrismarme@augustana.edu

Spring 2022.


ECON-345-01. Money and Banking. Tuesdays and Thursdays. 8:30-10:10. Lingberg 205

ECON-406-01.  Development Economics. Tuesdays and Thursdays. 12:20-2:00. Evald 113.

Office Hours:   9:00-11:00 Mondays and Wednesdays. 

These times don’t work for you?  If we need to meet one-on-one we can easily set something up either face to face or using Google Meet!  Right before or right after class we can discuss a time that works out best for both of us.  


Follow these links to the web pages for the following classes:

If we are working together, regardless of the class, you should read this: Learning (Your First Job)  by Robert Leamnson

STUDENTS: To provide input into my teaching (criticisms, suggestions, praise.) click here!

(Please note that  I teach more than one class a term. You should therefore mention in your message what class you are taking from me and what section of that class you are in.)

Click here for help with study skills.

Why are you here?  Check out the following link! Liberal Arts at Augustana.

Also look at this piece published in the Williams Alumni Review.

 


Useful sites:

Online Journals

Things statistical and mathematical.

The Jerome Levy Institute

Online Stop Watch!

Annual report on the condition of America's infrastructure.

An absolutely fantastic site maintained by Real PAC (the real property association of Canada)

Elemental Economics.

Macroeconomic Time Series Data Source Locator

Webpage for Analysis of Financial Time Series.

Money and Banking Newsletter.

Pretend that you're chair of the Fed 

Live 8 and the G8 summit.

A History of Economic Thought (William J. Barber)

The Quick MBA

Karl Marx, Capital, volume 1

American Public Media Marketplace

Virtual Zambia

Chicago Encyclopedia of History.

Fedstats.

Education Portal (Macroeconomics)

(Check this out.)

 

 

Personal:  Music.  Notes and Ideas (A very old blog.  Have not had the time to maintain.)